Shopping Cart

Your shopping cart is empty
Visit the shop

Your Adv Here

By Victoria Jaggard With the water ban lifted, more than…

Aquí algunos trucos y aplicaciones para optimizar la experiencia con…

Raymondville– Dos mexicanos enfrentan la pena capital por la muerte…

Gaza– El primer ministro Benjamin Netanyahu pidió ayer a los…

Hrabove— Plegándose a la presión internacional, los separatistas pro rusos…

Distrito Federal— El Gobierno federal no permitirá que los migrantes…


More Shoot 'Em Up games from Miniclip '); ?>

takingsidesNew Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is considered Wall Street’s anointed son for the presidency. He’s backed by some of the ruthless and suspect figures in New Jersey politics. Among other supporters Gov. Christie has hedge fund managers and corporate executives and billionaires like the Koch brothers.
However, Gov. Christie’s supporters have to be sweating it out now that the brewing scandal over the closing of traffic lanes on the George Washington Bridge, is proving to be in retaliation for the Fort Lee mayor’s refusal to support the governor’s 2013 reelection. During his re-election Governor Christie was pitched to the public as a regular guy, someone who speaks bluntly and candidly, someone you would want to have a beer with. But this is public relations crap. He is and has long been a hatchet man for corporate firms and big banks. But even though Governor Christie is wounded, he’s not down. Chris Christie will most likely emerge scathed from this mess, but he’ll continue as governor. He’s apologized for the actions of his staff. Some Democrats insist that he should resign precisely because he didn’t know what was going on. This is hypocritical on their part; it’s like blaming President Obama for the NSA scandal.
As for his presidential bid, some Republicans claim Chris Christie isn’t really one of them. Some pundits are claiming, even as scandal erupts around him, that he’s a “different kind of Republican.”Christie is said to be “heartless, smug, bullying embodiment” of a thug politician. He and his staff reflect a world in which other people are nothing more than rubes to be manipulated and exploited, whether they’re trying to escape the trap of long-term unemployment or Fort Lee during the morning rush hour.
And that’s coming from political hacks in his own party. In truth, the Fort Lee scandal happened because Mr. Christie (or his aides) weren’t content with winning re-election. He wanted to make sure that he was seen as the Don in his state.
Christie’s large public entourage always includes a videographer who captures the governor’s frequent public humiliation of those–public school teachers are his favorite targets for ridicule–who have the audacity to question his judgment. These exchanges are immediately edited and uploaded to YouTube to show how tough he is and that as the Don, no one can touch him.
The visceral need by Christie to ridicule and threaten anyone who does not bow before him, his dark lust for revenge, his greed, gluttony and hedonism, his need to surround himself with large, fawning entourages and his obsequiousness to corporate power are characteristics corporate titans embrace and understand. Which stands to reason why so many in his party are now after him. The emperor has no pants, shirt, socks or suit. He is now vulnerable to the same Donlike politicians lining up to run for president representing his party. A presidential dream Christie can forget about.

Los Ángeles.- La policía de Los Ángeles abrió una investigación por un incidente protagonizado por el rapero Kanye West y un joven de 18 años, quien según su testimonio y el de varios testigos fue agredido físicamente por el cantante.
Kanye propinó varios puñetazos al joven por haberle dirigido insultos racistas y contra su pareja, la popular socialité Kim Kardashian.
Todo comenzó cuando el cantante comenzó a espantar a los paparazzi que acosaban a su mujer, momento aprovechado por el adolescente para agredir a su mujer.
“Que te jodan, zorra. Amante de un negro, estúpida zorra”, le gritó el adolescente en el lugar, por lo que ella de inmediato llamó a su pareja.
Al ver que el agresor había entrado en la consulta de un quiropráctico, Kanye y Kim siguieron sus pasos y lo encontraron en la sala de espera, donde, según el relato testigos citados por TMZ, el rapero se le abalanzó para golpearlo.
Cuando llegó la policía, el desconocido aseguró que quería presentar cargos contra el músico.

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.49.51 AM

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.49.51 AMOp-ed by Keli Goff
Last night’s Golden Globes may be considered a big night for the slavery epic 12 Years a Slave, which took home the award for best motion picture, drama. But it was not a big night for the film’s stars, director or frankly anyone else who happened to be black and in the room that evening.
Despite nominations in a number of major categories, black artists were shut out through the awards show. Making it particularly disappointing for many viewers is the fact that thanks to the box office and critical success of films like Lee Daniels’ The Butler and 12 Years a Slave, many were heralding 2013 as a banner year for black cinema.
Actors Chiwetel Ejiofor and Idris Elba were both nominated in the best actor category for their lead roles in 12 Years a Slave and Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. Lupita Nyong’o was nominated in the best supporting actress category for her role in 12 Years a Slave, and Barkhad Abdi was nominated in the best supporting actor category for his performance in Captain Phillips. Kerry Washington was nominated for
Black Hollywood Was Snubbed at Golden Globes
her role as Olivia Pope in Scandal, while Don Cheadle was nominated for his role in the series House of Lies. Steve McQueen was nominated for best director for 12 Years a Slave, while John Ridley, who penned the film’s screenplay, also received a nomination.
The disappointment online was palpable. High-profile African Americans revealed their increasing displeasure on Twitter throughout the evening. MSNBC’s Joy-Ann Reid tweeted “@TheReidReport If the mark of a great film is that it demands that you never, ever forget it, 12 Years a Slave should have swept tonight. GoldenGlobes”
Following Lupita Nyong’o’s loss, PBS’s Gwen Ifill tweeted: “Wait. @Lupita_Nyongo was dissed?”
While the win of 12 Years a Slave is significant, one award out of 26 is ultimately not.
The concern about the lack of diversity among this year’s winners was not limited to African Americans in media. Rachel Sklar, a prominent writer and advocate for gender diversity in Silicon Valley, tweeted the following exchange with Alex Leo, who works for Newsweek: “@thelist @rachelsklar (returning from an ice cream run): “What’d I miss?” @AlexMLeo “Nothing. White men won some awards.”
Both women are white.
So if 12 Years a Slave ultimately won the night’s major award, is there a legitimate reason for critics of color, and others, to be concerned?
In a word: absolutely.
While many have argued that 2013 turned out to be one of the strongest years for leading men in recent memory, with a number of compelling best actor performances across the spectrum, there is not a self-respecting critic on the planet who would pretend that Jennifer Lawrence’s performance in American Hustle and Lupita Nyong’o’s performance were in the same league. And I say that as a Jennifer Lawrence fan. Had Nyong’o won last night it is possible that there would have been less overall disappointment with how the evening turned out. But her loss struck many—if not all—except perhaps Lawrence’s friends and family, as such an egregious snub that it set an uncomfortable tone for the rest of the night.
Furthermore, having seen both films (and being personally partial to crime capers) I must say that the fact that American Hustle is being positioned as on par with 12 Years a Slave is, to put it mildly, perplexing. One is moderately entertaining. The other is

The Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) of Southeast Wisconsin has awarded a $25,000 “Innovations in Healthcare Delivery Pilot Model Grant” to develop a clinical decision support system to manage patients receiving deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease.
Christopher R. Butson, Ph.D., associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery, psychiatry & behavioral medicineat the Medical College of Wisconsin, is the primary investigator of the grant.
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to have great potential to improve the lives of patients with a variety of neurological conditions, and is an established therapy for Parkinson’s disease. However, a persistent problem in DBS isthe extensive and costly time necessary to choose stimulation settings after the electrode leads are implanted. This process is necessary to assure that patients are receiving the best therapeutic benefit from DBS with minimal side effects. However, recent studies from the Butson lab show that this time can be drastically reduced: preliminary data from a iPad-basedclinical decision support system showed that programming timewas reduced by more than 99% (from four hours to less than two minutes). With the CTSI grant, Dr. Butson’s research team plans to prospectively evaluate the clinical decision support system in the Movement Disorders Clinic at Froedtert Hospital.In this study, patients will be randomized after DBS surgery to standard care or selection of DBS settings using the iPaddecision support system.

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.39.28 AM

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.39.28 AMLos Ángeles— Bomberos en el sur de California combatían este martes de manera implacable incendios chicos pero potencialmente peligrosos, en tanto que los vientos secos de Santa Ana soplaban en la región y la vegetación se marchitaba por el descenso de la humedad a niveles de un sólo dígito.
Grandes contingentes de bomberos fueron enviados a hacer frente a los diversos incendios para impedir que se propagaran y se convirtieran en conflagraciones de mayor escala debido a las ráfagas de viento. Los vientos de Santa Ana, causados por una poderosa masa de aire de alta presión fija en el oeste, se intensificarán el martes en la noche, en tanto que se mantendrán los niveles de alerta hasta el miércoles al medio día, según los pronósticos.
Las alertas de bandera roja por peligro de incendio continuarán vigentes hasta el miércoles antes del anochecer, de acuerdo con las
previsiones.
En Jurupa Valley, en el condado de Riverside, 110 bomberos combatieron las llamas que eran atizadas por vientos de 40 kph (25 mph) en una propiedad de poco menos de una hectárea (dos acres).
El fuego destruyó dos casas, dos casas móviles, tres casas motorizadas, 40 vehículos en diferentes estados de reparación y 11 galpones, cobertizos y otras estructuras, dijo el capitán de los bomberos estatales, Lucas Spelman. Dos casas móviles fueron dañadas.
Alejandro Heredia salió huyendo con su hijo de tres años, otro de 15 días de nacido y un perro cuando las palmeras comenzaron a incendiarse en un paraje detrás de su casa.
Dijo que los bomberos se concentraron en salvar la casa de sus padres en las cercanías, mientras la que habitaba era destruida por el fuego.
“Pedimos ayuda y dijeron que hacían lo que podían”, afirmó Heredia a la publicación Riverside Press-Enterprise. “Todo se perdió. No quedó nada”, apuntó.
Después de cuatro horas, el lugar continuaba ardiendo y las cuadrillas de bomberos se concentraban en los sitios en llamas más problemáticos.

amyEsta semana, surgió nueva información acerca del robo y la filtración a la prensa de documentos clasificados del Gobierno de Estados Unidos que revelaron un amplio programa de vigilancia ultra secreto del Gobierno. No, la noticia no está relacionada con Edward Snowden y la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional (NSA, por sus siglas en inglés), sino con un grupo de activistas opositores a la guerra de Vietnam que cometieron uno de los robos más audaces de secretos del Gobierno en la historia de Estados Unidos, lograron evitar ser capturados y permanecieron en el anonimato durante cuarenta años. Entre ellos había dos profesores universitarios, una maestra de guardería y un taxista.
El grupo de siete hombres y una mujer, que se oponía enérgicamente a la Guerra de Vietnam, estaba seguro de que el FBI, bajo el mando de J. Edgar Hoover, estaba espiando a ciudadanos y reprimiendo activamente a los opositores. Para demostrarlo, irrumpieron en la oficina de campo del FBI en el barrio Media de Filadelfia, Pensilvania, el 8 de marzo de 1971 y robaron todos los archivos que había allí. Lo que encontraron, y enviaron por correo a la prensa, dejó al descubierto el programa de contrainteligencia del FBI, denominado COINTELPRO. El programa de espionaje consistía en una práctica de alcance mundial, clandestina e inconstitucional, de vigilancia, infiltración e intimidación de grupos de oposición que participaban en los movimientos de protesta y abogaban por el cambio social. El valiente robo no violento de este grupo de ladrones-activistas sacudió por completo al FBI, laCIA y a otras agencias de inteligencia. Su acto motivó investigaciones por parte del Congreso, un mayor control y la aprobación de la Ley de Vigilancia de Inteligencia Extranjera. Estos ladrones-activistas, la mayoría de los cuales recién ha salido a la luz pública esta semana, tras revelar sus identidades por primera vez, no solo tienen una historia fantástica que contar acerca del pasado, sino que además su historia proporciona una perspectiva crítica e informada acerca de Snowden, la NSA y el espionaje del Gobierno en la actualidad.
John Raines me dijo: “Decidimos que era hora de llamar la atención pública acerca de la vigilancia y la intimidación del Gobierno y el derecho de los ciudadanos a oponerse abiertamente. Creo que el combustible de la democracia es el derecho a oponerse, a disentir, debido a que donde hay poder y privilegios, el poder y los privilegios procuran eliminar del discurso público, en la medida de lo posible, todo lo que quieren. Eso hace que el derecho de los ciudadanos a disentir sea la última línea en la defensa de la libertad”. Raines era profesor de religión en la Universidad de Temple cuando él, su esposa, Bonnie, y los otros miembros del grupo que irrumpió en la oficina del FBIformaron lo que denominaron “Comisión de Ciudadanos para Investigar al FBI”. Como John y Bonnie Raines tenían tres hijos menores de diez años al momento del robo, les pregunté cómo fue que decidieron participar en una acto que les podría haber significado pasar años en prisión. John Raines respondió: “Como sociedad, a menudo pedimos a madres y padres que asuman actividades sumamente peligrosas como parte de su trabajo. Se lo pedimos a todos los policías, se lo pedimos a todas las personas que trabajan en el departamento de bomberos. Se lo pedimos a las madres y los padres que, como miembros del Ejército y de la Armada, son enviados a otros países para defender nuestras libertades. Le pedimos con frecuencia a la gente que realice trabajos que ponen en riesgo a sus familias. Ahora estamos de nuevo analizando al año 1971, cuando nadie en Washington iba a hacer lo necesario para revelar lo que J. Edgar Hoover estaba haciendo en el FBI. Éramos la última línea de la defensa. De modo que, como ciudadanos, tomamos la iniciativa e hicimos lo que debíamos hacer porque nadie en Washington lo iba a hacer”.
Bajo la dirección de Bill Davidon, un profesor de física de la Universidad de Haverford, el grupo se reunió y planificó meticulosamente la acción. La mayoría de las reuniones se llevaron a cabo en el ático de John y Bonnie Raines. Bonnie se hizo pasar por una estudiante universitaria que estaba escribiendo un trabajo acerca de las oportunidades laborales para las mujeres en el FBI, y logró echar un vistazo por dentro a la oficina de campo de Media. Keith Forsyth, el taxista, realizó un curso de cerrajería por correspondencia y fabricó sus propias herramientas para no levantar sospechas de las autoridades. Eligieron la noche del 8 de marzo de 1971 porque la atención internacional estaba puesta en la pelea de boxeo de peso pesado entre Mohamed Ali y Joe Frazier. Keith Forsyth dijo por qué esto fue importante: “Hicimos muchas cosas para tratar de evitar que nos atraparan y esta fue una de ellas. Quien lo haya sugerido, no tengo idea de quién fue, pensó que funcionaría como distracción, no solo para la policía, sino para el público en general”.
Entraron a la oficina, robaron los archivos y se los llevaron a una granja a una hora de Filadelfia. Revisaron los documentos y quedaron estupefactos por lo que leyeron. Un memorando detallaba las conclusiones de una conferencia del FBI sobre la Nueva Izquierda que pronosticaba que si el FBI aumentaba los interrogatorios de activistas, eso “incrementaría la paranoia endémica en esos círculos y serviría para enviar el mensaje de que hay un agente del FBI detrás de cada buzón”. Esto encontró eco en una periodista que recibió los documentos filtrados, Betty Medsger, del Washington Post. El fiscal general durante el Gobierno del Presidente Richard Nixon, John Mitchell, intentó que el Post censurara los artículos de Medsger.
Betty Medsger me contó: “Debo señalar dos cosas: primero, que fue la primera vez que un periodista recibía documentos secretos del Gobierno de una fuente externa que los había robado. De modo que eso planteó una serie de consideraciones con respecto a qué hacer con los documentos. Pero fue una decisión muy difícil para Katharine Graham, la editora responsable del Washington Post, que, hasta ese momento, nunca se había encontrado con algo similar, porque fue la primera vez que se vio enfrentada a un pedido del Gobierno de Nixon de no publicar un artículo. Y ella no quería publicarlo. Y el asesor interno y los abogados tampoco querían publicarlo, pero dos directores del diario se dieron cuenta desde un comienzo de que era un tema muy importante y lo promovieron. Se trata de Ben Bradlee y Ben Bagdikian. Mientras tanto, yo estaba allí, escribiendo inocentemente mi artículo, una simple periodista de Filadelfia, y no supe hasta las seis de la tarde que estaban considerando no publicarlo”. El periódico se imprimió y se hizo historia. En aquel entonces, Medsger desconocía la identidad de los activistas. Esta semana publicó un libro titulado The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI (El robo: el descubrimiento del FBI secreto de J.Edgar Hoover), en el que menciona el nombre de la mayoría de los activistas-ladrones, con su consentimiento. También se produjo un documental sobre el caso, titulado “1971”, que se estrenará próximamente.
En respuesta a las revelaciones del libro, el portavoz delFBI, Michael Kortan, sostuvo: “Varios acontecimientos de esa época, entre ellos el robo, contribuyeron a que se cambiara el modo en que el FBI identificaba y trataba las amenazas a la seguridad nacional, lo que dio pie a la reforma de las políticas y prácticas de inteligencia del FBI, entre ellas, la creación de directrices de investigación por parte del Departamento de Justicia”.
Si aplicáramos el criterio de Michael Kortan sobre el robo de documentos de 1971 a las revelaciones de Edward Snowden acerca de la NSA, el Presidente Barack Obama debería abandonar los cargos en su contra y recibirlo de regreso en Estados Unidos, con un agradecimiento. Esperemos que Snowden no tenga que esperar 43 años.

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.19.34 AM

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.19.34 AMWashington– El poder judicial de Estados Unidos dijo el martes al Congreso que rechaza la idea de que haya un defensor independiente para asuntos de privacidad en el Tribunal de Vigilancia a la Inteligencia Extranjera, pero varios congresistas elogiaron el concepto durante una audiencia en el Capitolio.
Hablando a nombre de todo el sistema judicial, el juez de distrito John D. Bates envió una carta a la Comisión de Inteligencia del Senado en la que dijo que nombrar un defensor independiente para el tribunal de vigilancia secreta _FISC, por sus iniciales en inglés_ es innecesario y posiblemente contraproducente.
Bates también fustigó otras propuestas de reformas clave, al afirmar que significarían un trabajo mucho más pesado para el tribunal secreto. En las audiencias actuales del FISC, los jueces solo escuchan los argumentos del gobierno cuando busca una orden para realizar espionaje.
Bates dijo que abrir el proceso a un defensor de la privacidad _quien nunca podría reunirse con el sospechoso ni defender las acusaciones en su contra_ no crearía la clase de alegato visto en un proceso penal o civil.
“Dada la naturaleza de los procesos de la FISA, la participación de un defensor no crearía una auténtica contraposición de argumentos ni ayudaría a las cortes a evaluar los hechos”, escribió.
Los miembros del grupo de trabajo presidencial que recomendó crear tal defensor insistieron en la propuesta ante la Comisión de Asuntos Jurídicos del Senado, al igual que el presidente de ese panel, el demócrata Patrick Leahy, durante una audiencia realizada el martes sobre los programas de vigilancia de la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (NSA por sus siglas en inglés).
Cass Sunstein, un miembro del Grupo de Revisión a las Tecnologías de Inteligencia y Comunicaciones, dijo que el tribunal secreto no debe tomar decisiones sobre ley o políticas sin escuchar una voz de oposición.
“Eso no es congruente con nuestras tradiciones legales”, dijo Sunstein.
Se espera que el presidente Barack Obama anuncie el viernes qué cambios está dispuesto a hacer para resolver las preocupaciones por la privacidad, las libertades civiles y los aspectos legales que se plantearon por las tácticas de vigilancia de la NSA.
Los miembros del grupo de trabajo elegido por el presidente también defendieron su propuesta de encargar la tarea de almacenar registros telefónicos de los estadounidenses, actualmente a cargo de la NSA, directamente a las compañías telefónicas.
Cuando el senador Charles Grassley, republicano por Iowa, expresó su preocupación sobre si las compañías telefónicas podrían resguardar con seguridad los metadatos telefónicos, el profesor de Derecho de la Universidad de Chicago Geoffrey Stone reconoció que podría ser algo para preocuparse..
No obstante, Stone dijo que el panel concluyó que había una amenaza mucho mayor en el futuro sobre el posible mal uso de los datos telefónicos por parte del gobierno.
Las compañías telefónicas se oponen a la tarea de almacenar los datos. Les preocupa estar expuestas a demandas y costos si el gobierno les pide conservar información acerca de los usuarios por más tiempo que en la actualidad.
Directivos y abogados de las compañías telefónicas se han quejado del plan en reuniones confidenciales con autoridades y congresistas influyentes de comisiones de inteligencia, de acuerdo con testimonios recabados por The Associated Press.
Según dos directivos con conocimiento de las discusiones, la industria de la telefonía móvil dijo al gobierno que prefiere que la NSA mantenga el control del programa de espionaje y sólo aceptaría cambios si tiene obligación legal. Los directivos hablaron en forma anónima porque no estaban autorizados a divulgar el contenido de las conversaciones privadas.
Sin embargo, también ha habido quejas públicas. “Nuestros afiliados se pondrán a la imposición de obligaciones para conservar datos por más tiempo del necesario”, dijo Jot Carpenter, vicepresidente de asuntos gubernamentales en la CTIA-The Wireless Association (Asociación CTIA-Inalámbrica), el grupo que congrega a la industria de telefonía móvil.
Directivos y abogados de la industria dijeron que las compañías serían renuentes a convertirse en guardianes de los registros telefónicos y solo lo harían si las leyes actuales se cambiaran para relevarlos de responsabilidades legales y de cubrir los costos.
La responsabilidad es una preocupación para las telefónicas, que podrían ser demandas en caso de que algún intruso cibernético tuviera acceso no autorizado a los registros. Bajo la ley antiterrorista “Patriot Act”, que rige el programa de recolección de llamadas telefónicas de la NSA, las empresas de telefonía no son responsables legalmente cuando entregan información al gobierno en investigaciones sobre terrorismo.

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.05.16 AM

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 11.05.16 AMMiles de docentes se manifestaron hoy desde horas de la mañana en contra de la Ley 160 que modifica el Sistema de Retiro de Maestros (SRM) y como parte del paro de 48 horas que tiene sin operar al sistema público de enseñanza del país.
A la manifestación llegaron maestros de diferentes partes de la isla, como Culebra, San Sebastián, San Lorenzo, Mayagüez, Carolina, Canóvanas y Fajardo.
“Quien es ese que se escucha, el maestro en pie de lucha” y “donde están los maestros que defienden el Retiro, donde están, aquí”, eran algunas de las consignas que gritaban los docentes en el frontis del Departamento del Trabajo, donde se realizó también la reunión entre el secretario de la agencia, Vance Thomas, y miembros del Frente Amplio en Defensa del Sistema de Retiro de Mestros (Fadsrm).
A la cita no llegó ni el secretario de Educación, Rafael Román, ni la alcaldesa de San Juan, Carmen Yulín Cruz Soto.
“Si esto no se resuelve volvemos a estar en la calle hasta que Dios lo decida”, dijo la presidenta de la Asociación de Maestros, Aida Díaz, luego de concluir la reunión con parte del comité de diálogo y que se extendió por más de una hora.
La portavoz de Educamos, Eva Ayala, expresó que “lo que hemos hecho hoy es la madre de los paros”.
“Le decimos a García Padilla que venga a contar aquí, no sabe contar, no sabe, pero les tengo una noticia hoy en esta reunión estaba invitado el secretario de Educación y no llegó”, señaló Ayala en referencia a las expresiones de ayer, martes, del gobernador sobre que supuestamente los maestros no se presentaron en las escuelas para apoyar el paro.
Los docentes realizaron la manifestación en momentos en que se desarrolla un paro de 48 horas que paralizó el sistema de educación pública de la isla.
El paro fue convocado por el Frente Amplio, que agrupa seis organizaciones, entre ellas la Asociación de Maestros de Puerto Rico, con unos 25 mil docentes activos y 11 mil jubilados, tiene como objetivo inmediato una demostración de fuerza durante los dos días del paro, en un intento de forzar al gobierno a introducir cambios en la recién aprobada Ley 160 de 2013.
María Lara, presidenta de la Federación de Maestros, que no pertenece al Frente Amplio
pero sí se unió al paro, expresó que si el gobierno accedió al diálogo fue por la presión de los maestros.
“Tenemos que ir a ese diálogo sabiendo que solamente vamos a lograr que esto se fructifique si continuamos con la lucha”, recalcó.
Agregó que “esto no se puede caer, hay que organizarnos en cada uno de los planteles, en cada una de las escuelas”.

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 10.57.09 AM

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 10.57.09 AMDistrito Federal— Legisladores del PRI y PAN detuvieron la comparecencia del Secretario de Hacienda, Luis Videgaray, para explicar al Congreso el impacto en las finanzas públicas del decreto del Ejecutivo Federal en que otorga beneficios fiscales al sector empresarial.
Argumentaron que no era necesaria la presencia del titular de Hacienda, debido a que bastaba con un informe sobre cómo serán afectadas las estimaciones de recaudación en el ISR, IVA, IEPS, Derechos y el Código Fiscal de la Federación.
En la sesión de la Tercera Comisión de la Comisión Permanente había dos propuestas de acuerdo sobre el decreto del Ejecutivo, publicado en el Diario Oficial de la Federación el día 26 de diciembre.
El diputado del PT, Ricardo Cantú, propuso la comparecencia del Secretario Videgaray para que explicara por qué se emitió el decreto.
Por otro lado, los diputados del PRD Carol Antonio Altamirano y Roxana Luna plantearon que se enviara al Congreso un informe del impacto en las finanzas públicas por los beneficios fiscales al sector privado.
A nombre del PRI, el diputado Pedro Pablo Treviño manifestó que no era necesaria la comparecencia y que no estaban a discusión las facultades del Presidente de la República para emitir el decreto, lo cual cuestionaba el petista.
Propuso una “fusión” de los puntos de acuerdo, ya que abordaban el mismo tema, pero con el rechazo a la comparecencia.
El senador del PAN, Javier Lozano, apoyó la idea de que no debería citarse al Secretario Videgaray, porque a los funcionarios deben comparecer cuando sea estrictamente indispensable y si el caso lo amerita.
Dijo que se debía aprobar sólo el punto de acuerdo de los legisladores del PRD para que Hacienda entregue un informe sobre la afectación a los ingresos por dicho decreto.
“No creo necesario que pidamos la comparecencia, es más que suficiente con el informe”, aseveró el senador del PAN.
Por el PRI, el diputado Manuel Añorve y el senador Omar Fayad expresaron que su partido estaba de acuerdo en que el Gobierno entregara el Congreso la información sobre el decreto publicado, y que más adelante podría valorarse una comparecencia.
Por Movimiento Ciudadano, Ricardo Mejía comentó que debía comparecer Luis Videgaray no sólo por el decreto emitido por el Ejecutivo, sino también por la polémica que ha generado el Servicio de Administración Tributaria.
Señaló que el SAT ha publicado “listas negras” de contribuyentes y por otro lado se niega a dar a conocer a quiénes se les condonaron impuestos el año pasado.
Mencionó que al Secretario de Hacienda también se le tendría que cuestionar las modificaciones en las proyecciones del crecimiento económico y los índices de inflación que han crecido.
Presionó para que no hubiera una “fusión” de puntos de acuerdo, por lo que se votó primero la propuesta de los perredistas de pedir al Ejecutivo, a través de la SHCP, que desglose y haga público el cálculo del impacto a las finanzas por el decreto que otorga facilidades fiscales a sectores empresariales.
Se aprobó pedir que se detalle la afectación en metas del déficit aprobado para el 2014, como queda la composición de ingresos y los ajustes en el Presupuesto de Egresos en el gasto de inversión y en los programas de las dependencias federales.
Después fue desechado el punto de acuerdo propuesto por el PT para que Videgaray compareciera

By John Fund | National
Review Online
Liberals who oppose
efforts to prevent voter
fraud claim that there is
no fraud — or at least not
any that involves voting
in person at the polls.
But New York City’s
watchdog Department of
Investigations has just
provided the latest evidence
of how easy it is to
commit voter fraud that is
almost undetectable.
DOI undercover
agents showed up at 63 polling places last fall
and pretended to be voters
who should have been
turned away by election
officials; the agents assumed
the names of individuals
who had died or moved out of town, or who were sitting in jail. In 61 instances, or 97 percent of the time, the testers were allowed to vote. Those who did vote cast only a write-in vote for a “John Test” so as to not affect the outcome of any contest. DOI published its findings two weeks ago in a searing 70-page report accusing the city’s Board of Elections of incompetence, waste, nepotism, and lax procedures.
The Board of Elections, which has a $750 million annual budget and a workforce of 350 people, reacted in classic bureaucratic fashion, which prompted one city paper to deride it as “a 21st-century survivor of Boss Tweed–style politics.” The Board approved a resolution referring the DOI’s investigators for prosecution. It also asked the state’s attorney general to determine whether DOI had violated the civil rights of voters who had moved or are felons, and it sent a letter of complaint to Mayor Bill de Blasio.
Normally, I wouldn’t think de Blasio would give the BOE the time of day, but New York’s new mayor has long been a close ally of former leaders of ACORN, the now-disgraced “community organizing” group that saw its employees convicted of voter-registration fraud all over the country during and after the 2008 election. Greg Soumas, president of New York’s BOE, offered a justificationfor calling in the prosecutors: “If something was done in an untoward fashion, it was only done by DOI. We (are) unaware of any color of authority on the part of (DOI) to vote in the identity of any person other than themselves — and our reading of the election law is that such an act constitutes a felony.”
The Board is bipartisan, and all but two of its members voted with Soumas. The sole exceptions were Democrat Jose Araujo, who abstained because the DOI report implicated him in hiring his wife and sister-and-law for Board jobs, and Republican Simon Shamoun.
Good-government groups are gobsmacked at Soumas’s refusal to smell the stench of corruption in his patronage-riddled empire.
“They should focus not on assigning blame to others, but on taking responsibility for solving the problems themselves,” Dick Dadey of the watchdog groupCitizens Union told the Daily News. “It’s a case of the Board of Elections passing the buck.”
DOI officials respond that the use of undercover agents is routine in anti-corruption probes and that people should carefully read the 70-page report they’ve filed before criticizing it. They are surprised how little media attention their report has received.
You’d think more media outlets would have been interested, because the sloppiness revealed in the DOI report is mind-boggling.
Young undercover agents were able to vote using the names of people three times their age, people who in fact were dead. In one example, a 24-year female agent gave the name of someone who had died in 2012 at age 87; the workers at the Manhattan polling site gave her a ballot, no questions asked.
Even the two cases where poll workers turned away an investigator raise eyebrows. In the first case, a poll worker on Staten Island walked outside with the undercover investigator who had just been refused a ballot; the “voter” was advised to go to the polling place near where he used to live and “play dumb” in order to vote. In the second case, the investigator was stopped from voting only because the felon whose name he was using was the son of the election official at the polling place.
Shooting the messenger has been a typical reaction in other states when people have demonstrated just how easy it is to commit voter fraud.
Guerrilla videographer James O’Keefe had three of his assistants visit precincts during New Hampshire’s January 2012 presidential primary. They asked poll workers whether their books listed the names of several voters, all deceased individuals still listed on voter-registration rolls. Poll workers handed out 10 ballots, never once asking for a photo ID.
O’Keefe’s team immediately gave back the ballots, unmarked, to precinct workers. Debbie Lane, a ballot inspector at one of the Manchester polling sites, later said: “I wasn’t sure what I was allowed to do. … I can’t tell someone not to vote, I suppose.”
The only precinct in which O’Keefe or his crew did not obtain a ballot was one in which the local precinct officer had personally known the dead “voter.”
New Hampshire’s Democratic Gov. John Lynch sputtered when asked about O’Keefe’s video, and he condemned the effort to test the election system even though no actual votes were cast.
“They should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law, if in fact they’re found guilty of some criminal act,” he roared.
But cooler heads eventually prevailed, and the GOP Legislature later approved a voter-ID bill, with enough votes to override the governor’s veto. Despite an exhaustive and intrusive investigation, no charges were filed against any of O’Keefe’s associates.Later in 2012, in Washington, D.C., one of O’Keefe’s assistants was able to obtain Attorney General Eric Holder’s ballot even though Holder is 62 years old and bears no resemblance to the 22-year-old white man who obtained it merely by asking if Eric Holder was on the rolls.
But the Department of Justice, which is suing Texasto block that state’s photo-ID law, dismissed the Holder ballot incident as “manufactured.” The irony was lost on the DOJ that Holder, a staunch opponent of voter-ID laws, himself could have been disenfranchised by a white man because Washington, D.C., has no voter-ID law. Polls consistently show that more than 70 percent of Americans — including clear majorities of African-Americans and Hispanics — support such laws. Liberals who oppose ballot-security measures claim that there are few prosecutions for voter fraud, which they take to mean that fraud doesn’t happen. But as the New York DOI report demonstrates, it is comically easy, given the sloppy-voter registration records often kept in America, to commit voter fraud in person. (A 2012 study by the Pew Research Center found that nationwide, at least 1.8 million deceased voters still are registered to vote.) And unless someone confesses, in-person voter fraud is very difficult to detect — or stop.
New York’s Gothamist news service reported last September that four poll workers in Brooklyn reported they believed people were trying to vote in the name of other registered voters. Police officers observed the problems but did nothing because voter fraud isn’t under the police department’s purview.
What the DOI investigators were able to do was eerily similar to actual fraud that has occurred in New York before. In 1984, Brooklyn’s Democratic district attorney, Elizabeth Holtzman, released a state grand-jury report on a successful 14-year conspiracy that cast thousands of fraudulent votes in local, state and congressional elections. Just like the DOI undercover operatives, the conspirators cast votes at precincts in the names of dead, moved and bogus voters. The grand jury recommended voter ID, a basic election-integrity measure that New York steadfastly has refused to implement.
In states where non-photo ID is required, it’s also all too easy to manufacture records that allow people to vote. In 2012, the son of Congressman Jim Moran, the Democrat who represents Virginia’s Washington suburbs, had to resign as field director for his father’s campaign after it became clear that he had encouraged voter fraud. Patrick Moran was caught advising an O’Keefe videographer on how to commit in-person voter fraud. The scheme involved using a personal computer to forge utility bills that would satisfy Virginia’s voter-ID law and then relying on the assistance of Democratic lawyers stationed at the polls to make sure the fraudulent votes were counted. Last year, Virginia tightened its voter-ID law and ruled that showing a utility bill was no longer sufficient to obtain a ballot.
Given that someone who is dead, is in jail, or has moved isn’t likely to complain if someone votes in his name, how do we know that voter fraud at the polls isn’t a problem? An ounce of prevention — in the form of voter ID and better training of poll workers — should be among the minimum precautions taken to prevent an electoral miscarriage or meltdown in a close race.
After all, even a small number of votes can have sweeping consequences. Al Franken’s 312-vote victory in 2008 over Minnesota U.S. Sen. Norm Coleman gave Democrats a filibuster-proof Senate majority of 60 votes, which allowed them to passObamacare. Months after the Obamacare vote, a conservative group called Minnesota Majorityfinished comparing criminal records with voting rolls and identified 1,099 felons — all ineligible to vote — who had voted in the Franken–Coleman race. Fox News random interviews with 10 of those felons found that nine had voted for Franken, backing up national academic studies that show felons tend to vote strongly for Democrats.
Minnesota Majority took its findings to prosecutors across the state, but very few showed any interest in pursuing the issue. Some did, though, and 177 people have been convicted as of mid 2012 — not just “accused” but actually convicted — of voting fraudulently in the Senate race. Probably the only reason the number of convictions isn’t higher is that the standard for convicting someone of voter fraud in Minnesota is that the person must have been both ineligible and must have “knowingly” voted unlawfully. Anyone accused of fraud is apt to get off by claiming he didn’t know he’d done anything wrong.
Given that we now know for certain how easy it is to commit undetectable voter fraud and how or moved out of town, or who were sitting in jail. In 61 instances, or 97 percent of the time, the testers were allowed to vote. Those who did vote cast only a write-in vote for a “John Test” so as to not affect the outcome of any contest. DOI published its findings two weeks ago in a searing 70-page report accusing the city’s Board of Elections of incompetence, waste, nepotism, and lax procedures.
The Board of Elections, which has a $750 million annual budget and a workforce of 350 people, reacted in classic bureaucratic fashion, which prompted one city paper to deride it as “a 21st-century survivor of Boss Tweed–style politics.” The Board approved a resolution referring the DOI’s investigators for prosecution. It also asked the state’s attorney general to determine whether DOI had violated the civil rights of voters who had moved or are felons, and it sent a letter of complaint to Mayor Bill de Blasio.
Normally, I wouldn’t think de Blasio would give the BOE the time of day, but New York’s new mayor has long been a close ally of former leaders of ACORN, the now-disgraced “community organizing” group that saw its employees convicted of voter-registration fraud all over the country during and after the 2008 election. Greg Soumas, president of New York’s BOE, offered a justificationfor calling in the prosecutors: “If something was done in an untoward fashion, it was only done by DOI. We (are) unaware of any color of authority on the part of (DOI) to vote in the identity of any person other than themselves — and our reading of the election law is that such an act constitutes a felony.”
The Board is bipartisan, and all but two of its members voted with Soumas. The sole exceptions were Democrat Jose Araujo, who abstained because the DOI report implicated him in hiring his wife and sister-and-law for Board jobs, and Republican Simon Shamoun.
Good-government groups are gobsmacked at Soumas’s refusal to smell the stench of corruption in his patronage-riddled empire.
“They should focus not on assigning blame to others, but on taking responsibility for solving the problems themselves,” Dick Dadey of the watchdog groupCitizens Union told the Daily News. “It’s a case of the Board of Elections passing the buck.”
DOI officials respond that the use of undercover agents is routine in anti-corruption probes and that people should carefully read the 70-page report they’ve filed before criticizing it. They are surprised how little media attention their report has received.
You’d think more media outlets would have been interested, because the sloppiness revealed in the DOI report is mind-boggling.
Young undercover agents were able to vote using the names of people three times their age, people who in fact were dead. In one example, a 24-year female agent gave the name of someone who had died in 2012 at age 87; the workers at the Manhattan polling site gave her a ballot, no questions asked.
Even the two cases where poll workers turned away an investigator raise eyebrows. In the first case, a poll worker on Staten Island walked outside with the undercover investigator who had just been refused a ballot; the “voter” was advised to go to the polling place near where he used to live and “play dumb” in order to vote. In the second case, the investigator was stopped from voting only because the felon whose name he was using was the son of the election official at the polling place.
Shooting the messenger has been a typical reaction in other states when people have demonstrated just how easy it is to commit voter fraud.
Guerrilla videographer James O’Keefe had three of his assistants visit precincts during New Hampshire’s January 2012 presidential primary. They asked poll workers whether their books listed the names of several voters, all deceased individuals still listed on voter-registration rolls. Poll workers handed out 10 ballots, never once asking for a photo ID.
O’Keefe’s team immediately gave back the ballots, unmarked, to precinct workers. Debbie Lane, a ballot inspector at one of the Manchester polling sites, later said: “I wasn’t sure what I was allowed to do. … I can’t tell someone not to vote, I suppose.”
The only precinct in which O’Keefe or his crew did not obtain a ballot was one in which the local precinct officer had personally known the dead “voter.”
New Hampshire’s Democratic Gov. John Lynch sputtered when asked about O’Keefe’s video, and he condemned the effort to test the election system even though no actual votes were cast.
“They should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law, if in fact they’re found guilty of some criminal act,” he roared.
But cooler heads eventually prevailed, and the GOP Legislature later approved a voter-ID bill, with enough votes to override the governor’s veto. Despite an exhaustive and intrusive investigation, no charges were filed against any of O’Keefe’s associates.Later in 2012, in Washington, D.C., one of O’Keefe’s assistants was able to obtain Attorney General Eric Holder’s ballot even though Holder is 62 years old and bears no resemblance to the 22-year-old white man who obtained it merely by asking if Eric Holder was on the rolls.
But the Department of Justice, which is suing Texasto block that state’s photo-ID law, dismissed the Holder ballot incident as “manufactured.” The irony was lost on the DOJ that Holder, a staunch opponent of voter-ID laws, himself could have been disenfranchised by a white man because Washington, D.C., has no voter-ID law. Polls consistently show that more than 70 percent of Americans — including clear majorities of African-Americans and Hispanics — support such laws. Liberals who oppose ballot-security measures claim that there are few prosecutions for voter fraud, which they take to mean that fraud doesn’t happen. But as the New York DOI report demonstrates, it is comically easy, given the sloppy-voter registration records often kept in America, to commit voter fraud in person. (A 2012 study by the Pew Research Center found that nationwide, at least 1.8 million deceased voters still are registered to vote.) And unless someone confesses, in-person voter fraud is very difficult to detect — or stop.
New York’s Gothamist news service reported last September that four poll workers in Brooklyn reported they believed people were trying to vote in the name of other registered voters. Police officers observed the problems but did nothing because voter fraud isn’t under the police department’s purview.
What the DOI investigators were able to do was eerily similar to actual fraud that has occurred in New York before. In 1984, Brooklyn’s Democratic district attorney, Elizabeth Holtzman, released a state grand-jury report on a successful 14-year conspiracy that cast thousands of fraudulent votes in local, state and congressional elections. Just like the DOI undercover operatives, the conspirators cast votes at precincts in the names of dead, moved and bogus voters. The grand jury recommended voter ID, a basic election-integrity measure that New York steadfastly has refused to implement.
In states where non-photo ID is required, it’s also all too easy to manufacture records that allow people to vote. In 2012, the son of Congressman Jim Moran, the Democrat who represents Virginia’s Washington suburbs, had to resign as field director for his father’s campaign after it became clear that he had encouraged voter fraud. Patrick Moran was caught advising an O’Keefe videographer on how to commit in-person voter fraud. The scheme involved using a personal computer to forge utility bills that would satisfy Virginia’s voter-ID law and then relying on the assistance of Democratic lawyers stationed at the polls to make sure the fraudulent votes were counted. Last year, Virginia tightened its voter-ID law and ruled that showing a utility bill was no longer sufficient to obtain a ballot.
Given that someone who is dead, is in jail, or has moved isn’t likely to complain if someone votes in his name, how do we know that voter fraud at the polls isn’t a problem? An ounce of prevention — in the form of voter ID and better training of poll workers — should be among the minimum precautions taken to prevent an electoral miscarriage or meltdown in a close race.
After all, even a small number of votes can have sweeping consequences. Al Franken’s 312-vote victory in 2008 over Minnesota U.S. Sen. Norm Coleman gave Democrats a filibuster-proof Senate majority of 60 votes, which allowed them to passObamacare. Months after the Obamacare vote, a conservative group called Minnesota Majorityfinished comparing criminal records with voting rolls and identified 1,099 felons — all ineligible to vote — who had voted in the Franken–Coleman race. Fox News random interviews with 10 of those felons found that nine had voted for Franken, backing up national academic studies that show felons tend to vote strongly for Democrats.
Minnesota Majority took its findings to prosecutors across the state, but very few showed any interest in pursuing the issue. Some did, though, and 177 people have been convicted as of mid 2012 — not just “accused” but actually convicted — of voting fraudulently in the Senate race. Probably the only reason the number of convictions isn’t higher is that the standard for convicting someone of voter fraud in Minnesota is that the person must have been both ineligible and must have “knowingly” voted unlawfully. Anyone accused of fraud is apt to get off by claiming he didn’t know he’d done anything wrong.
Given that we now know for certain how easy it is to commit undetectable voter fraud and how serious the consequences can be, it’s truly bizarre to have officials at the New York City Board of Elections and elsewhere savage those who shine a light on the fact that their modus operandi invites fraud. One might even think that they’re covering up their incompetence or that they don’t want to pay attention to what crimes could be occurring behind the curtains at their polling places. Or both.
John Fund is a national-affairs columnist for National Review Online. Along with Hans von Spakovsky, he is the author of Who’s Counting: How Fraudsters and Bureaucrats Put Your Vote at Risk .serious the consequences can be, it’s truly bizarre to have officials at the New York City Board of Elections and elsewhere savage those who shine a light on the fact that their modus operandi invites fraud. One might even think that they’re covering up their incompetence or that they don’t want to pay attention to what crimes could be occurring behind the curtains at their polling places. Or both.
John Fund is a national-affairs columnist for National Review Online. Along with Hans von Spakovsky, he is the author of Who’s Counting: How Fraudsters and Bureaucrats Put Your Vote at Risk .

corey-singleyMilwaukee – The Milwaukee County medical examiner’s report states that the death of 16-year-old Corey Stingley, who died after being restrained by three customers at a West Allis convenience store, was homicide.
The medical examiner ruled that Stingley’s death was cause by anoxic encephalopathy, or brain damage caused by lack of oxygen. Milwaukee County Supervisor David F. Bowen today questioned a decision by Dist. Atty. John Chisholm not to file charges in the death last year of Corey Stingley, a West Allis teenager who was restrained by bystanders at a West Allis convenience store after he tried to shoplift alcohol. Stingley died of asphyxiation.
Bowen said Stingley’s death was a key issue for people of color throughout the entire community.
“This is a pressing issue for race relations for Milwaukee County,” Bowen said. “West Allis has a growing population of people of color, and they are concerned that this sort of action is condoned by local authorities. Those who detained Stingley should have known they were doing harm. Clearly, the victim was in the wrong in trying to shoplift, but it should not have cost him his life.
“The District Attorney ruled that the three who detained Stingley did not mean to harm him. Yet their actions caused his death. How can something like this happen without consequences? Stingley’s family is hurting, and this ruling only increases the devastation for them.”
Bowen called on the community to view video related to the incident to help the public understand how Stingley’s death occurred. He said the public could judge for themselves.
“Corey Stingley’s death has wide-reaching implications for the community, and failure to file charges against those who restrained and ultimately killed him

Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 10.04.39 AM

Por Screen Shot 2014-01-20 at 10.04.39 AMMiguel Ignacio Acabal Milwaukee – La organización “Mexican Fiesta” celebró el pasado sábado el Día de Reyes en su sede, localizada en la 2997 S. 20th St., a  donde recurrieron padres de familia acompañados de sus niños. El ingreso del público estuvo bajo cierto control en cuanto a cantidad, por lo de la capacidad del salón que se destinó para el evento, ya que se tuvo que registrar primero para poder estar en dicho acto, pues al ingreso cada persona debía presentar el número que le había tocado y, luego, podía pasar sin problemas.
A la entrada del salón había un grupo de voluntarios que servía dulces y palomitas a los niños, mientras se iban a sentar para ver una película que se les había preparado, se trataba de los Tres Reyes Magos que, de acuerdo con las historias bíblicas, fueron a ver al Niño Dios que había nacido como Salvador del Mundo y que, pese a ello, había nacido en un pesebre.
Tras finalizar la película, grandes y chicos formaron su respectiva fila para pasar por el champurrado y un pedazo de pan de Rosca de Reyes; luego de degustar dicha bebida, la presidenta de “Mexican Fiesta”, Teresa Mercado, invitó a los padres de familia si querían que sus hijos se tomaran fotos con la mascota de la Policía, el perro McGruff, del Distrito #6, que lo podían hacer.
Posteriormente, el Obispo Auxiliar de la Arquidiócesis, Donal J. Hying, ofició la misa que se había previsto para la ocasión, después de la entrada de la Virgen María y José, seguidos de los Tres Reyes Magos: Gaspar, Baltazar y Melchor que personificaron la historia mencionada.
En su homilía, Monseñor Hying dijo que “estamos aquí hoy porque hace un poco más de dos mil años vino a visitar nuestro mundo el Hijo de Dios, quien nació como cualquier niño… y por eso es que hemos venido aquí para compartir con los niños; y, este domingo 12 de enero finalizará la época navideña”.
El coro Voces Mundues acompañó con su música cristiana durante el tiempo que duró dicho servicio religioso.
Como todas, la misa tuvo un lapso de una hora, y luego se repartió la hostia a los fieles que quisieron recibirla.
La actividad estuvo más orientada a los infantes, ya que además de haberles rifados juguetes mucho antes de todo el programa, hubo una presentación de bailes folklóricos de la cultura mexicana, los cuales fueron protagonizados por niños.
Ya para finalizar toda la actividad, los Reyes Magos volvieron a ingresar para repartir más juguetes a los niños que se habían inscrito con antelación; más de 350 juguetes fueron regalados a la misma cantidad de niños, los cuales habían sido recaudados meses antes, según se dio a conocer.
La presidenta de “Mexican Fiesta” dijo que fue un total de 700 personas las que estuvieron presentes en este acto, quien a la vez manifestó su complacencia por haber logrado llevar a feliz término este evento, pues con esta edición se cumplen 14 años los que su organización viene realizando este festejo.
Sólo las personas que estuvieron presentes podrán afirmar la trascendencia de la conmemoración del Día de Reyes, pues se pudo observar que los presentes sí disfrutaron de la actividad y más haber compartido el tiempo entre familias y amigos.

Distrito Federal— El senador Manuel Bartlett Díaz acusó al presidente Enrique Peña Nieto, al ex presidente Carlos Salinas de Gortari y al secretario de Gobernación, Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong, de haberle ordenado a la revista Proceso la publicación de un reportaje en el que testigos protegidos aseguran que el ex gobernador de Puebla presenció la tortura y asesinato del ex agente de la DEA Enrique Kiki Camarena.
“Esta es una artimaña de Peña Nieto y Osorio Chong para golpearme por mi posición de defensa del petróleo”, señaló Bartlett en entrevista con Carmen Aristegui en MVS Noticias.
“Esto proviene de Salinas de Gortari, en este asunto que no tiene ni pies ni cabeza, que sale precisamente ahora, en mi lucha contra la entrega del petróleo de Peña Nieto y sugrupo. No me van a callar la boca”, subrayó.
En su edición 1949 que circula esta semana, la revista Proceso publica un reportaje del periodista Jesús Esquivel, en el que se detalla que tres ex policías acogidos desde finales de los noventa al programa estadounidense de testigos protegidos, declararon que Manuel Bartlett, entonces secretario de Gobernación, y Juan Arévalo Gardoqui, titular de la Secretaría de la Defensa, presenciaron el homicidio de Camarena en 1985.
“Lo que dice la revista Proceso es absurdo, fantasioso y es jocoso”, soltó Bartlett. El senador del PT aseveró que el homicidio de Camarena es un asunto ya juzgado, en el que todos los responsables, salvo el capo Rafael Caro Quintero, permanecen en la cárcel.
“Yo tenía responsabilidades de seguridad, pero no negocié nunca ni con la CIA ni con la DEA”, puntualizó.
En el reportaje en circulación, uno de los testigos protegidos sostiene que Manuel Bartlett fue testigo del homicidio de Camarena.
Dijo: “Bueno… en la sala de la casa estaban el general Vinicio Santoyo Feria (comandante de la 15 Zona Militar, con sede en Guadalajara); el general Arévalo Gardoqui (entonces secretario de la Defensa); Manuel Bartlett Díaz; Félix, el cubano, quien iba con otro extranjero al que no identifiqué ni supe su nacionalidad; Miguel Aldana Ibarra (director de la Interpol-México); Manuel Ibarra Herrera (director de la PJF), Espino Verdín y otros más”.
Durante la entrevista en Noticias MVS, Bartlett insistió en reiteradas ocasiones que le resultaba sospechoso que Proceso hubiera publicado una fotografía de él en su portada más reciente. “¿Sabes de dónde proviene? De Salinas de Gortari, él fue quien puso en marcha los ataques”, sostuvo.
El senador fue interrogado por los participantes en la Mesa Política de MVS, Denise Dresser, Lorenzo Meyer y Sergio Aguayo, quienes le recordaron su actuación como secretario de Gobernación en 1985, y cuestionaron la relación que tuvo con los representantes de la CIA y la DEA en México.
“Usted se presenta como una blanca paloma, que salió de una cloaca”, cuestionó Dresser.
“El hecho es que tenemos ahí una nebulosa y no se sabe cuál fue el papel de Bartlett en caso Camarena”, secundó Sergio Aguayo.
“No hay tal ‘nebulosa’. Usted sabe que este caso ya fue juzgado (…) No hay una sola prueba que me implique en el caso Camarena. Uno es responsable de lo que es responsable y a mí no me pueden responsabilizar de tonterías como esa”, remató Bartlett.
Y antes de concluir añadió que fue él quien desapareció la Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) y atacó el problema “como nunca se había hecho”.
“Esto es la venganza del gobierno mexicano”, insistió el senador del PT.
De acuerdo con los testimonios que los ex agentes de la DEA proporcionaron a Proceso, Enrique Camarena Salazar descubrió que la CIA protegía operaciones de narcotráfico de Rafael Caro Quintero –hoy declarado prófugo– y que las ganancias por la venta de drogas servían para financiar a la contra en Nicaragua.
De acuerdo con dichos testimonios, al descubrir el contubernio, la CIA ordenó asesinar a Camarena.

The Milwaukee HUD Office will be moving from the 13th floor of their building at 310 West Wisconsin Avenue to the 9th floor. As a result, due to the actual move and lack of access to their phones, systems, and emails, there will be days and times when they will not be able to respond to your emails and/or calls as timely as they would like. The Milwaukee HUD staff will begin packing the week of January 20th and relocate to their new space on February 3rd.

Ante un grupo de niños un hombre contó la siguiente historia:
Marcos era el hijo de un humilde entrenador de caballos. Su padre ganaba muy poco dinero y solo podía cubrir las necesidades básicas para mantener a su familia y mandar al niño al colegio.
Una mañana en la escuela, el profesor les pidió a los alumnos que escribieran cómo querían que fuese su vida cuando fueran adultos.
Marcos escribió siete páginas, esa noche, en la que describía su meta. Relató su sueño con mucho cuidado, detallando los pormenores e incluso dibujó un plano de todo el proyecto.
Él deseaba una gran extensión de terreno donde tener una vivienda, establos para los caballos, corrales para diversos tipos de animales y tierras dedicadas a la siembra y a la ganadería.
El proyecto era un sueño perfecto. Después de trabajar en él varias horas, creyó tener el proyecto más ambicioso que un niño podría llegar a tener. Con ánimo de ganador, al día siguiente se lo entregó a su profesor.
Dos días más tarde, recibió de vuelta su trabajo reprobado y con una nota que decía: «Ven a verme después de clases» Marcos, muy enojado, fue a ver a su profesor y antes de que éste dijera nada, le preguntó:
–¿Por qué usted me reprobó?
–Tranquilízate y siéntate, creo que lo tuyo es un sueño imposible de concretar. No tienes recursos; tienes una familia muy pobre. Para lograr lo que quieres, necesitarías mucho dinero.
Primero tendrías que comprar el terreno, pagar para construir todo lo que pretendes hacer, comprar los animales, semillas para la siembra y además tendrías muchos gastos de mantenimiento. Creo que es un proyecto millonario, que no estás en condiciones de lograr.
Quiero que revises tu trabajo y consideres algunos aspectos más realistas; tómate unos días, vuelve con el nuevo trabajo y reconsideraré nuevamente la nota, le dijo el profesor.
Marcos regresó a su casa, pero para nada estaba convencido. Pensó mucho tiempo en el asunto y finalmente le pidió consejo a su padre, para saber qué opinaba sobre esta idea.
Éste con mucha sabiduría, le respondió:
–Mira, hijo, tienes que decidir por ti mismo, creo que es una decisión muy importante para tu vida. Si crees de verdad que puedes llegar a lograr, tu sueño, a pesar de la opinión de tu profesor, hazlo. Mi consejo es que consultes a Dios, si tus deseos están dentro de Su voluntad, nadie en este mundo va a impedir que se haga realidad lo que te has propuesto.
–Gracias por tu consejo, papá, creo que tengo la respuesta para el profesor, respondió Marcos.
Regresó a la escuela, con el mismo proyecto, se lo entregó al profesor y le dijo:
«Usted puede quedarse con mi mala nota, yo me quedaré con mi sueño»
Los niños, que estaban escuchando la historia muy atentamente, recibieron una lección muy importante. Pero eso no era todo, el hombre les dijo:
Esta historia, es mi historia. Ustedes están en la casa que me propuse conseguir cuando era niño, mis sueños, se cumplió hasta el más mínimo detalle. Todavía conservo aquella tarea del colegio como recuerdo y símbolo de una fantasía que se hizo realidad.
«Jamás trates de robarle un sueño a nadie, simplemente porque tú no lo creas posible, porque un sueño sumado a la voluntad de Dios, siempre es realizable, por más alocado que éste te parezca»

Miss Universe 2005Caracas — Gunmen killed a former Miss Venezuela and her British-born partner in front of their young daughter in an attack that shocked the crime-plagued nation, authorities said Tuesday.
Monica Spear, a 29-year-old soap opera star, and Thomas Henry Berry, 39, were killed in what appears to have been a botched robbery after their car broke down on a highway in northwestern Venezuela late Monday, police and prosecutors said.
Their daughter, five-year-old Maya Berry Spear, was wounded in the right leg but was stable after receiving medical treatment after a crime that put a harsh spotlight on Venezuela’s soaring homicide rate.
Five people have been detained and were interrogated in connection with the killings, Interior Minister Miguel Rodriguez said after a televised meeting with President Nicolas Maduro, who vowed to use an “iron hand” to crack down on crime.
The family was driving on a highway when their car hit a blunt object that had been placed on the road, forcing them to pull over, said forensic police director Jose Gregorio Sierralta. There are suggestions that the object was deliberately placed there as part of a planned armed robbery.
Spear waved down a tow truck, which stopped to help on the road between Puerto Cabello and Valencia in the state of Carabobo, Sierralta said.
But as the two truck workers operated the crane, five armed men emerged on the road.
The truck’s operators fled to a police station about 1.5 kilometers (one mile) away while the mother, father and child locked themselves in their car in a desperate attempt to shield themselves from the killers.
But “the criminals fired multiple shots at the vehicle” before fleeing without stealing anything, Sierralta said.
Investigators impounded the couple’s car and took testimony from the two tow truck operators.
Spear, who was a quarter-finalist in the 2005 Miss Universe contest, appeared in the Miami-based Telemundo series “Pasion Prohibida” (“Forbidden Passion”) and “Flor Salvaje” (“Savage Flower”).
The dark-haired actress, who lived in Miami, was on holiday in her native Venezuela. She had posted videos of the countryside and herself horse riding on Instagram in the last couple of days.
Her husband was born in Britain but has Venezuelan citizenship.
“This is a massacre,” said Maduro, who vowed to curb the country’s runaway violence during his presidential campaign last year.
“This violence is a sickness that we have,” he said from the Miraflores presidential palace.
Maduro called some 100 mayors and governors to an urgent meeting on Wednesday to coordinate action against crime.
Venezuelans who work in movies, theater and TV called a rally for Wednesday in Caracas to denounce the oil-rich country’s epidemic of street violence.
Venezuela is deeply divided between supporters and critics of the late populist president Hugo Chavez and his successors. NGOs and the government give different figures on just how dangerous Venezuela is to live in. But Maduro made an appeal for this killing not to be used for political gain.
“I take my responsibility to the maximum,” the socialist leader said, warning the killers that “whoever wants to kill will see an iron hand.”
Venezuela has one of the world’s highest murder rates, with 79 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants in 2013, according to the non-profit Venezuelan Observatory of Violence.
The interior ministry, however, gave a lower murder rate of 39 homicides per 100,000.
Opposition leader Henrique Capriles, who refused to concede defeat to Maduro in presidential elections last year, reacted to the killings by calling on his rival to put aside “deep differences and unite against the lack of security, as one bloc.”
The beauty queen’s killing shocked fellow artists in Venezuela, a country which is passionate about soap operas and the Miss Universe contenders it regularly produces.
Actress Gaby Espino, who lives in Miami, said she would never return to her home country.
“This is the day-to-day life in our country. We have all left Venezuela, fleeing in fear, terrified because this is the reality of our country. And today it happened to Monica,” Espino told the Telemundo network.
“I love my country, but I won’t set another foot in Venezuela,” she said.
Venezuelan telenovela director Leonardo Padron said he was “absolutely saddened, horrified, speechless, over the murder of my dear Monica Spear! My God!”
Telemundo, a leading Spanish-language network in the United States, said in a statement that it was “deeply shocked and saddened by the horrible crime that hit our dear actress Monica Spear and her family.”
Jencarlos Canela, Spear’s American co-star and love interest in “Pasion Prohibida,” expressed grief on Twitter, writing: “I am speechless. I will miss you my friend @MonicaSpear.”
Addressing Spear’s daughter, he added: “My pretty, beautiful Maya, I love you. You are not alone!”

Screen Shot 2014-01-13 at 11.38.13 AM

Screen Shot 2014-01-13 at 11.38.13 AMLas Vegas— Sony lanzará este año un servicio de televisión basado en Internet que ofrecerá una mezcla de programas en vivo y video en demanda.
Andrew House, director de Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., dio la noticia ayer en la muestra tecnológica CES tras meses de especulación en el sentido de que Sony estaba preparando ese servicio.
House dice que el servicio tendrá canales personalizados para atender los gustos del auditorio. Dijo que permitirá a los televidentes saber qué están viendo sus amigos. Sony planea empezar las pruebas con el servicio en Estados Unidos este año.
De acuerdo con la cantidad de hogares que tienen dispositivos de Sony conectados a Internet, se estima que el servicio estará entre los cinco principales proveedores de programas de televisión en el país.
También juegos
Sony anunció también ayer su muy esperado servicio de streaming de juegos, y dijo haber vendido más de 4.2 millones de unidades de su nueva consola PlayStation 4.
PlayStation Now, que iniciará su fase de prueba este mes y será lanzado a mediados de año en Estados Unidos, permitirá a los jugadores acceder a títulos de gran éxito en la “nube” de Internet y reproducirlos en un conjunto de dispositivos que se ampliará con el tiempo, dijo Sony.
El nuevo servicio de juegos en streaming ofrecerá a los jugadores de PlayStation acceso a juegos de consolas de generaciones anteriores y permitirá a los usuarios jugar en otros dispositivos conectados a Internet, como teléfonos inteligentes y tabletas, según el presidente de Sony Computer Entertainment, Andrew House.
Sony demostró el servicio en algunos modelos de televisores inteligentes Bravia en su stand en el Salón Internacional de Electrónica de Consumo (CES).
Una queja frecuente de los jugadores que sepasan a las consolas de nueva generación es que en los nuevos dispositivos no funcionan los juegos de modelos anteriores. El servicio de Sony comenzará ofreciendo títulos de gran éxito para jugar en las consolas PS4 y PS3, y en los dispositivos de Vita, el titán del entretenimiento japonés.
El objetivo de PlayStation Now es que la gente “juegue donde quiera, cuando quiera”, dijo Sony. El servicio incorpora tecnología de la compañía de juegos en la nube Gaikai, que Sony compró en 2012 por 380 millones de dólares.
Los jugadores podrán alquilar títulos en PlayStation Now o pagar suscripciones mensuales del servicio, dijo House.